Capacity Development for Water Supply and Sanitation Authorities

Tanzania’s water sector was reformed in 2002 and thereafter GIZ started a capacity development programme for the newly established water utilities responsible for supplying water in urban areas. The public utilities are supposed to work commercially but still face various challenges like high volume of water losses or insufficient human resources that prevent them from fulfilling their mandate. The GIZ capacity development programme focuses on different areas of  performance of the utilities and covers technical as well as organisational  and commercial issues. Extending its programme over the years, improvement measures financed by GIZ reach over 105 water utilities in the whole country. Since December 2013 a  consulting company  implements the measures on behalf of GIZ.

The component supports two other important institutions in the Tanzanian water sector on a long-term basis:

1) The Water Development and Management Institute, offers training  for technicians in the water sector. Among others, GIZ assists in the development of a Water Technician Fund which offers loans to students.

2) The Association of Tanzanian Water Suppliers (ATAWAS) which is an umbrella organisation for water utilities in the country.

Objective:

Improvement of the water supply and sanitation utilities in terms of their institutional and personnel capacities.

The capacity development programme has supported and achieved the following results:

  • Water utilities participating in the project have reported significant improvements: They produce more water, generate more income and serve more customers. Important management tools such as strategic and business plans are in place. Standard operating procedures and customer service charters are among the recently produced operational instruments to harmonise and streamline the utilities’ work.
  • Four water utilities participating in the GIZ capacity development programme, received performance awards from the regulatory authority EWURA.  
  • The Top Management of the Ministry of Water requested  technical support to improve its organisational structures and training the heads of Departments in a change management process
  • With GIZ support the enrolment of students in the Water Development and Management Institute has increased from 70 to more than 300. The number of privately sponsored students has more than doubled and female graduates are growing in number.
  • Since being supported by GIZ, about 50% of the water utilities are active members of ATAWAS and the association is playing a central role in helping its members improve their performance, among others in financial autonomy.